Oluce Angoli 387 Floor Lamp
  • Oluce Angoli 387 Floor Lamp
  • Oluce Angoli 387 Floor Lamp
  • Oluce Angoli 387 Floor Lamp
  • Oluce Angoli 387 Floor Lamp
  • Oluce Angoli 387 Floor Lamp
  • Oluce Angoli 387 Floor Lamp

Oluce Agnoli 387 Floor Lamp

€700.00
Availability if not in stock 1 to 2 weeks.
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Oluce started out in 1945, founded by Giuseppe Ostuni: the 387 model, always know simply as "Agnoli" after its designer, is therefore the oldest item currently in the catalogue. An absolute forerunner of minimalism, the Agnoli model takes the extraordinary "Cornalux" or "hammerhead" bulb, capable of directing the light in a highly precise manner, mounting it onto a sliding tube on a stem. Sophisticated thick travertine base: another element in which simplicity and functionality are transformed into poetry.

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Specifications

Floor lamp giving direct light, Travertino stone base, stem and height adjustable reflector
Mat nickel-plated
1 x max 48W - (G9)

Size Description

Diameter foot 17 cm
Height 190 cm

  • Tito Agnoli

    Tito Agnoli was born into an Italian family, in Lima, Peru, in 1931. He came to Italy after the war. Trained as a painter (having studied with Sironi), in 1949 he enrolled in the Faculty of Architecture, where he graduated in 1959 and was assistant to Gio Ponti and to Carlo De Darli. However, even in the early Fifties, he was already carrying out an intense professional activity in the field of design. He has created projects for, among others, Arflex, Cinova, Lema, Matteo Grassi, Molteni, Montina, Oluce, Pierantonio Bonacina, Poltrona Frau, Schiffini, Ycami. Several times recommended for the Compasso d'Oro (Golden Compass) Award, in 1986 he won the gold medal at the Neocon in Chicago. Some of his pieces are kept in the permanent collection of the MoMa in New York. He died in Milan on February 2012.
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