Louis Poulsen PH 5 Pendant Light - 150th Anniversary Edition
  • Louis Poulsen PH 5 Pendant Light - 150th Anniversary Edition
  • Louis Poulsen PH 5 Pendant Light - 150th Anniversary Edition
  • Louis Poulsen PH 5 Pendant Light - 150th Anniversary Edition

Louis Poulsen PH 5 Pendant Light - 150th Anniversary Edition

€942.15
€847.93
Availability if not in stock 1 to 4 Weeks
Shipping Costs
€53.50
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Poul Henningsen developed the PH 5 in 1958 in response to constant changes in the shape and size of light bulbs.In this way, a lamp was created that could be used with any light source. The iconic design is based on the same principles as Henningsen's three-shade system, which ensures that the light is soft, pleasant and completely glare-free.That makes it the perfect table lamp for the dining room. Originally, the PH 5 was equipped with red and blue lampshades to improve the color of the light.However, in later designs they have been removed as modern light sources reproduce daylight much more effectively than in 1958.

The PH 5 is available in a number of different color variants and is a much-loved and well-known pendant lamp, found in many homes around the world.

This anniversary edition is painted matte white on the outside with soft pink on the inside, which provides a soft, warm light, while the metalized brass supports add a nice touch.

Specifications

Material Colour Matt white, pale rose, metallized brass

Bulb base E27 Light source 9-12W LED (not included)

IP rating 20 Protection class II

Voltage 230 V Nominal frequency 50 Hz

Certifications and labels CE marked, tested and approved according to European standards

Cable length 300 cm

Cable colour White Cable material Textile

Weight 2.4 kg

Canopy Yes Ceiling plug 

Size Description

Width 50 cm
Diameter 50 cm
Height 26.7 cm

  • Poul Henningsen

    Poul Henningsen was born in Copenhagen by the famous Danish actress Agnes Henningsen. He never graduated as an architect, but studied at The Technical School at Frederiksberg, Denmark from 1911-14, and then at Technical College in Copenhagen from 1914-17. He started practicing traditional functionalistic architecture, but over the years his professional interests changed to focus mainly on lighting which is what he is most famous for. He also expanded his field of occupation into areas of writing, becoming a journalist and an author. For a short period at the beginning of WWII, he was the head architect of the Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen. But like many other creative people, he was forced to flee Denmark during the German occupation but soon became a vital part of the Danish colony of artists living in Sweden.
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